Filed Under: Money, Payment Cards, Payment systems, Payments, Privacy and security

TLS, DSS, and NCS(C)

Leave a Comment

As I was scanning my list of security-related posts and articles recently, my eye was drawn by the first sentence of an article on (Google security engineer) Adam Langley’s blog, indicating that Her Majesty’s Government does not understand TLS 1.3. Of course, my first thought was that since HMG doesn’t seem to understand the principles of encryption itself, it’s hardly surprising that they don’t understand TLS. However, these aren’t the thoughts of an understandably non-technical politician but instead those of Ian Levy, the Technical Director of the National Cyber Security Centre at GCHQ – someone you’d hope does understand encryption and TLS. Now normally, I would read this type of article without feeling the need to comment. So what’s different?

Well, following the bulk of the article discussing how proxies are currently used by enterprises to examine and control the data leaving their organisation, by in effect masquerading as the intended server and intercepting the TLS connection, is the following throwaway line:

For example, it looks like TLS 1.3 services are probably incompatible with the payment industry standard PCI-DSS…

Could this be true? Why would it be true? The author provided no rationale for this claim. So, again in the spirit of Adam Langley, “it is necessary to write something, if only to have a pointer ready for when people start citing it as evidence.”

Adam’s own response – again following a discussion about how the problem with proxies is their implementation, not with TLS – is that

…the PCI-DSS requirements are general enough to adapt to new versions of TLS and, if TLS 1.2 is sufficient, then TLS 1.3 is better. (Even those misunderstanding aspects of TLS 1.3 are saying it’s stronger than 1.2.)

which would seem to make sense. Not only that, but

[TLS 1.3] is a major improvement in TLS and lets us eliminate session-ticket encryption keys as a mass-decryption threat, which both PCI-DSS- and HIPAA-compliance experts should take great interest in.

In turn, Ian follows up to clarify that it’s not TLS itself that could present problems, but the audit process employed by organisations

The reference to regulatory standards wasn’t intended to call into question the ability of TLS 1.3 to meet the data protection standards. It was all about the potential to affect (badly) audit regimes that regulated industries have to perform. Right or wrong, many of them rely on TLS proxies as part of this, and this will get harder for them.

So that’s alright. TLS 1.3 is not incompatible with PCI DSS. So what is the problem?  Well, helpfully, Simon Gibson outlined this in 2016:

…regulated industries like healthcare and financial services, which have to comply with HIPAA or PCI-DSS, may face certain challenges when moving to TLS 1.3 if they have controls that say, “None of this data will have X, Y, or Z in it” or “This data will never leave this confine and we can prove it by inspecting it.” In order to prove compliance with those controls, they have to look inside the SSL traffic. However, if their infrastructure can’t see traffic or is not set up to be inline with everything that is out of band in their PCI-DSS, they can’t show that their controls are working. And if they’re out of compliance, they might also be out of business.

So the problem is not that TLS 1.3 is incompatible with PCI DSS. It’s that some organisations may have defined controls with which they will no longer be able to show compliance. They may still be compliant with PCI DSS – especially if the only change is to upgrade to TLS 1.3 and keep all else equal – but cannot demonstrate this. So what’s to be done?

Well, you could redefine the controls if necessary. If your control requires you to potentially degrade, if not break, the very security that you’re using to achieve compliance in the first place, is it really suitable? In the case of the two example controls above, however, neither of them should actually require inspection of SSL traffic.

For the organisation to be compliant in the first place, access to the data must only be possible to authorised personnel on authorised (i.e. controlled) systems. If you control the system, you can stop that data leaving the organisation more effectively by prohibiting its access to arbitrary machines in the external world. After all, you have presumably restricted access to any USB and other physical storage connectors, and you hopefully also have controls around visual and other recording devices in the secured area. It is difficult in today’s electronic world to think of a situation where a human (other than the cardholder) absolutely must have access to a full card number without (PCI DSS-compliant) alternatives being available.

So TLS 1.3 is a challenge to organisations who are using faulty proxies and/or inadequate controls already. It certainly doesn’t make you instantly non-compliant with PCI DSS.

Given this, we, as humble international payments security consultants, are left puzzled by the NCSC’s line about TLS 1.3 and PCI DSS compatibility. At worst, organisations need to redefine their audit processes to use the enhanced security of TLS 1.3, rather than degrade their security to meet out of date compliance procedures. But, of course, this is the type of problem we deal with all the time, as we’re frequently called in to help payment institutions address security risks and compliance issues. TLS 1.3 is just another tool in a complex security landscape, but it’s a valuable one that we’re adding to our toolkit in order to help our clients proactively manage their cyber defences.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Tags: , , ,