Filed Under: Banking and Finance, Crime & Fraud, Finance and Banking, Retail, Retail and Transit

Using Big Data to Identify Fraudulent Transactions

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With Thanksgiving upon us and the drive for mass consumption to continue through the Black Friday and Cyber Monday purchasing frenzy in the US, we regularly hear the comment from US merchants that the migration to EMV (contact) payment cards has driven the increase in Card Not Present (CNP) fraud. I guess to a small extent they’re correct; smartcards are more difficult to clone so the fraudsters have been forced to look for alternative sources of income. However, I would suggest that the main driver has been the increase in the efficiency with which fraudsters collect and use PII (personal identifiable information) and account information.

The days of shoulder-surfing people at the ATM for their PIN and/or stealing a phone for the PII and account information stored within it are confined to the minor or opportunistic criminals. Today the specifications for PANs, test PAN numbers and real PII and account information from data breaches within the many high street names, can be purchased on the internet. These are used by organized criminals as the basis for attacks in which a range of PAN and CVV numbers are sent to multiple merchants to identify valid combinations. Valid account information is the then used to procure goods from a range of merchants.

Luckily for the merchants and banks that Consult Hyperion work with, there is a wealth of information available to determine whether or not a transaction is valid. The mobile network operators, either directly or through brokers such as Payfone (USA) and Enstream (Canada), can provide the location of the account holder’s mobile phone, which should be close to the location from which the payment transaction is initiated. The account holder’s behavioral patterns can be monitored to determine whether or not the transaction is out of character. Device fingerprinting companies such as InAuth and mSignia can tell them if the transaction has been initiated from a new device, or one with odd characteristics, such as a foreign keyboard.

However, not many companies understand the scope of the information that they have in their possession or how it can be used to mitigate the risks associated with fraudulent transactions. Recognizing the opportunity, a number of third parties are offering AI based services to help such organizations to use the patterns in their data to identify fraudulent transactions. Consult Hyperion’s customers have benefited from a more rigorous analysis of the data in their possession and how it is generated, before they started working with these third parties.

My colleagues at New York and Guildford, UK, have a detailed understanding of the messages passed between the Merchant and Issuer and all parties in between in a retail payment transaction. Over the last 15 years, we have used this knowledge to de-bug or optimize the flow of information between all parties. More recently we have been asked to evaluate how patterns in the data can be used to identify fraudulent transactions. You would be surprised how often the PAN number is included in the transaction message. Comparing each instance of the PAN will allow you to check that the criminals have not tampered with those messages.

The results of our analysis helped our clients to focus their engagement with prospective vendors. They now have a better understanding of how the different parts of their authorization systems interact with each other, what data can be monitored and why. Their initial discussions with third parties have moved from “Is this possible?”, to “This is what we want to do”.

I hope that you have a Great Thanksgiving if you are in the US or London this weekend and that between them, Uber, Equifax et al have left you with sufficient credible payment credentials to allow you to enjoy the consumer fest that follows. Me, personally, I am heading somewhere I can be off-grid for the weekend, if only to stay away from all those tempting offers.

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